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environment is nothing to complain about. >> and what about the personal and commercial banking business, one of the biggest segments of what you guys do. what kind of demand trends are you seeing? >> well, again, there's clearly a slow down on the consumer side, but we're coming off, you know, double digit growth rates, and we're now moving into midsingle digit growth rates. part half is intended. our government has taken an approach to try to slow down consumer debt levels and it's having an impact which i say is a good thing. when you look at loan demand on the commercial side, it remains very strong. as i say, investment demand, deposit demand has been very good. so when you look at the overall platform, it grew at 7% this year -- or this past quarter over quarter, and so it's a slightly slower environment, but as i say not all that bad. >> i mean, we talk about the good quarter you just completed, but you've had a good year at rbc, but don't you feel like the easy money, to use that term, is done now? you guys are going to have to work a little harder to keep that growth rate going, don'
strategic environment where the u.s. is supposedly more likely to be dealing in surgical operations and not heavy ground invasions. since the former vice president chose to compare food stamps and the defense budget, let's go ahead and take a look at what's actually happening on that front, too. the recently enacted farm bill cut the food stamp program by $8 billion which means about 850,000 households will lose $90 in monthly benefits. we've reported on that. this year, after 47 million people saw their food stamp benefits reduced because of budget cuts, that's the context, and yet everyone's talking about the military cuts because secretary hagel's proposed pentagon budget makes for an easy headline. like this. "pentagon plans to shrink army to pre-world war ii level." okay. here's what some of those cuts actually look like. this is the context behind these headlines. on the left there, see the military's current level. in the middle i, the proposed level. on the right, 1940 levels. here are total numbers. so while it may be sure, technically accurate, these cuts will bring about
in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> and later on the, to the ice cometh. we'll take you where the flooding arrived. take a look at this. the flooding arrives in frozen form. a frozen river moving fast. we'll be right back. hey guys! sorry we're late. did you run into traffic? no, just had to stop by the house to grab a few things. you stopped by the house? uh-huh. yea. alright, whenever you get your stuff, run upstairs, get cleaned up for dinner. you leave the house in good shape? yea. yea, of course. ♪ [ sportscaster talking on tv ] last-second field go-- yea, sure ya did. [ male announcer ] introducing at&t digital life. personalized home security and automation. get professionally monitored security for just $29.99 a month. with limited availability in select markets. ♪ witmarge: you know, there's in a more enjoyable way to get your fiber. try phillips fiber good gummies. they're delicious, and a good source of fiber to help support regularity. wife: mmmm husband: these are good! marge: the tasty side of fiber. from phillips. save you fifteen percent or
and greenpeace cofounder patrick moore. he made these comments before the senate environment and public works committee. he left greenpeace because he says that group became more interested in politics than the environment. what an announcement from him. >>> men who wait too long to become fathers could put their children at greater risk of developing mental health problems. that's according to a new study that followed more than 2.5 million men for 25 years. researchers found a child born to a 45-year-old father compared to a 24-year-old dad was three times more likely to have autism, 13 times more likely to have adhd, 25 times more likely to be bipolar and twice as likely to have schizophrenia. this is video you have to see to believe. two guys in those wing suits flying past christ the redeemer statue in britain. look at this. the two daredevils making that jump from about 6,500 feet. they landed safely. and what was the first thing they did? what do you think? what do you think? >> they prayed. >> drank a beer. look at that. >> they earned it. >> how close they get. nerve wracking. see yo
environment today, even a small business has to spend $20,000 to $30,000 just complying with the 2800 regulations we layered on them federally let alone the state and local. you know, erin, i invest in small businesses every week. what's what i do. you should have these people talk to you. or even better still, let the president talk to somebody running a 17-person business in massachusetts or 30 employees in california. and hear what they say. they would not agree with him. and i think that is the core and the essence of america that we're not listening to. we need to listen to these people. they should tell us what to do. what they want right now is less government. >> thank you very much. i remember, by the way, the president saying he was going to go back and cut a whole lot of regulations. there was a big push for that. when you say 2800 on average, i'm going to assume you know your stats on that. that's horrific. that's probably something you could agree with the president on, too. still to come, a controversial bill some say is anti-gay in front of arizona's governor tonight. w
in the environment is the culprit. state health officials have found nothing so far. you would think they would be working around the clock trying to find an answer talking to every single mom who's lost a baby. they're not and outrage is growing. here's senior correspondent elizabeth cohen. >> reporter: in the rural and fertile yakima valley, an alarming number of babies born with birth defects. anencephaly, babies born with much of their brain and skull missing. >> i was stunned. three in a couple month period of time. that's unheard of. they are such tragic, terrible outcomes. >> reporter: barron's shocking discovery prompted an investigation by the state health department, which showed that in three counties in a three-year period there were 23 cases of anencephaly, a rate four times the national average. what could be causing such a high rate here? is it just a coincidence or something more serious? this epidemiologist at the washington state health department conducted the investigation. >> did you find an answer? >> we have not found an answer. and it's very frustrating because this is s
environment. >> it's already threatened ben bethel's hotel. despite his sign saying, we serve everyone. he said gay customers inquiring about refunds and cancellations. >> that would result in 12 now, to $14,000 in lost revenue to the hotel. and that itself results in almost $2,000 in local and state sales tax revenues lost. >> reporter: with the tide turning, even republicans who supported and voted for the bill, like state senator steve pierce -- you didn't think it was targeting the lgbt? >> no, not at all. >> reporter: they're now urging governor brewer to veto it. >> we made a mistake, and now we have to fix it. >> reporter: if the governor doesn't sign or veto the bill by the end of the week it becomes law automatically. still, this morning an aide to the governor said this bill was never part of her agenda, another hint that a veto is likely. brian? >> mike taibbi starting us off from phoenix tonight, thanks. >>> a new fight that's erupted in public today over the end of the war in afghanistan. fed up and frustrated, the president of the united states issued an ultimatum to the pres
into cyclicals as we go forward at a low inflationary environment with the fed struggling. sgr >> financials were getting a little bit of a bid. maybe it was a rotation out of the over valued names. want to go back to the main point as we head into the close close. the dow is off almost 250 points. >> bear in mind, 1848 for ages, for weeks and weeks we were trying to break through the new highs, 1848. stutter steps, we finally got there then 1850 would sas resis. finally yesterday we were decisively over that. you get these stutter steps up and back. it's not -- it hasn't been a straight line up but so far since the end of january, we've been doing pretty well. february was a great month. >> the market has been pretty much straight up for the last couple weeks after that big pullback earlier this year, and i think we may be in for some more jitters. i agree with my colleagues here that, you know, some of it has to do with the weekend and the news in the ukraine, but i think there's a lot of geopolitical uncertainty. 21 elections coming up. there may be some excuses for a little pullback. >> subpr
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in that environment. but what the president is doing is going outside that system and that is what is frankly dangerous. >> it is interesting, you said, you corrected a lot of people, and i think we always forget these are the most divisive times, and you point out these are not the most divisive times, our framers lived through these times. but you said the response of congress must begin before the president leaves office, what are you challenging them to do? >> well, the problem is, sean, constitutional power is very easy to lose but much harder to regain. the same could be said of the balance in our system. i think to congress needs to act. i was astonished at how really feckless and inert that congress appears. i didn't think this was a partisan issue. the framers assumed, and particularly madison assumed that ambition would counteract ambition, that no matter our divisions, members of congress would jealously protect their power. i don't think he ever anticipated the congress like the one we're seeing. so congress needs to act. the first thing they have to do is get the courts to recogn
was saying, i want to be fair to the russian people consuming this in that controlled news environment, we're not saying that if you're buying the putin view of this, you know, that that's just -- you're just being dumb. i mean, there's a lot of ways in which he presents this that can sound reasonable if you hear nothing else. >> absolutely. and this has been one of the most amazing things of the putin project since he's come to power. he's created this kind of alternate reality. at first he did it domestically. when you're in russia, it's incredibly. the talk of democracy, the posters on the streets, the people out at also ryes, the lines at election booths. these are things that the kremlin orchestrates very, very carefully. this is the first time he's moved beyond his borders to do it there. so this is a very controlled campaign. it's a theatre. >> james welcome back to the show. thanks for joining us again. >>> coming up, vladimir putin's political machine. and later, breaking news from texas. wendy davis has become the first woman since anne richards to win a primary for governor of t
school wellness guidelines to help build healthier learning environments for our kids. and as part of this effort, we'll be eliminating advertisements for unhealthy food and beverages in our schools. because i think we can all agree that our classrooms should be healthy place where is kids are no, ma'am bombard eed for ads f junk food. our second announcement focuses on school breakfast. i cannot possibly overstate how important this is. right now millions of children in this country are showing up to school hungry every day. and that's why we're expanding our school breakfast program, ensuring that nearly 9 million kids in 2,000 schools start their day with a nutritious breakfast. >> joining me now, chef and owner of kraft restaurants. tom, we have come such a long way, when you consider what michelle obama has been campaigning for. >> pretty much dent kept at bay now for other children. the message is definitely getting across. the importance of school breakfast breakfasts, it really gets them learning. there was a study done recently that kids that get breakfast, not before the
not if this bill goes there you. >> in this kind of economic environment and all these businesses are putting pressure on, you're going to do the right thing and i think she did the right thing. >> i think if there was a history, particularly from the precedent of this law that i mentioned before, if there was a press didn't and history about lawsuits and so forth, she might have thought otherwise, business pressures or not. she's a very principled woman. you saw that with immigration, whether you agree with it or not. she's a very principled woman. >>> the fed is out of touch with the economy. we only have a minute or two. ken policari, i saw it, and enjoyed reading it, but didn't know what you were talking about. >> when they talk about unemployment coming down, how much better the economy is doing, and whether they're starting to withdraw, i don't net think that joe q. public feel the same way. i think there's a complete disconnect. when the fed says it, people are scratching their heads saying, what am i missing? they say they tell me everything is so great. >> there's a lot of truth to t
party in midterm election and the exception was the 2002 in the post-9/11 environment. the buck is going to stop with the incumbent party in power because america is not happy. i think quite likely the outcome the republicans keep the house and a possibility the republicans will pick up the senate even losing mitch mcconnell's seat. we have to be divided again until 2016. it is an opportunity for the republicans to put together a proactive message. i think it's a good time to be talking about our plans for the future in 2016. >> donny, you can look individually at the president and the way congress is viewed but take this all in tolg totta. 80% are angry or dissatisfied with the way things are going in washington. it's and old theme at this point. we see it in just about every poll. as robert said this is a pox on both houses. >> it's only three-point spread i think between the democrats and the republicans both on the negative side. statistically, not a big issue. i actually think that this is going to be a case of best human being wins a race. i think one could give an argument -- joe,
was nowhere around, nowhere near her and it was a very protected environment. this is very far from what a town hall in new hampshire, iowa, or any of the early primary states look like and, frankly, i was struck sitting there by how much measured, how cautious she was and the fact that she doesn't connect with young people nearly to the same level that her husband did or that barack obama does. they would have had that room vibrating. i found it quite inspirational. >> interesting to hear that. and that may play into what we're going to hear from glenn rush. you wrote an article that went off in "politico" overnight, a really, really interesting profile of joe biden. he sat down with him, interviewed him on an amtrack train. and you heard about this retreat that was attended by all sorts of joe biden insiders. and they went to this retreat and the people with joe biden came out saying this. you wrote this. the others at the biden retreat came away feeling that clinton would ultimately decide not to run. but insiders telling you they believe biden -- that hillary clinton would decide not
in an environment that was a little more forgiving. >> that was the president today being quite frank and personal about his past. before nousing a new initiative that deems to help the would be barack obamas around the country. speaking to a pack room that included the parents of trayvon martin, al sharpton to bill o'reilly, he described his my brother's keeper initiative. he will be pushing associations to help young help of color overcome the profound effects of racism to meet their potential. he made his case in terms of how it would benefit not just the boys in question but the nation as a whole. >> the fact too many of them are falling by the wayside. dropping out. unemployed. involved in negative behavior, going to jail. cycles of homelessness breeds violence and mistrust. and our country is a little less than what we know it can be. so we need to change the statistics. not just for the sake -- and boys but for the sake of america's future. >> for most of his five plus years in office the president has strenuously and stood justly avoided framing any of his policies that specifically target
was born the match, and that environment and that home lit the match. is that a fair way to say it? >> soccio: i think it's a very fair way to say it. >> stahl: after the murder, jeff's mom got custody of his four girls, because his wife pled guilty to leaving a loaded gun in the house. and every week, joann visited her son's young killer in juvenile hall. >> patterson: it's a struggle every minute of my life. because my son was murdered and i want justice for him... >> stahl: yeah. >> patterson: ...but only at the ex... that only happens at the expense of my grandson. >> stahl: what about politics with these children? do you feel any obligation to teach them about nazis? >> patterson: they're being raised conservative republican. we need more of those in california. ( laughs ) >> stahl: but what about nazism? >> patterson: it's gone for this family. >> kroft: last year, at age 13, joseph hall was convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to ten years in juvenile prison. aflac! aflac! got 'em. ♪ yeah, he's clean, boss. now listen to me, duck. i have an associate that met wi
that someone sees a gun on to how can we do this being least disruptive in a learning environment. and there's a lot of work to be done that lies ahead of us. >> there's one estimate that that work's going to cost over $2 million including retraining of police officers involved but now they're going to have to distinguish between good guns and bad guns on campus. where before all guns were bad on campus. greg, it seems to me that you might have some better educational purposes for that $2 million. >> well, yeah. and i think as a lot of letter writers have pointed out, i don't know nothing about guns, and i shouldn't have one. but with nine hours' training i too can become a hobbyist police officer and be authorized to bring a gun on campus and to use it according to my nine hours of training. i don't want vigilantes protecting me in my classroom. i think vigilante justice is best practiced at home. and i have nothing against it. just no, thanks, i don't need them to have guns if they're not trained officers of the law or have extensive experience. and people around them, professionals who wi
. the regulators are starting to look at it but overall it does show that as we move to a new environment where regulators are getting more involved we will have a regulatory scheme around bitcoin, hopefully we will have a shaking out where the firms that are doing it right and doing get better and protecting consumers and protecting against money-laundering will survive and proliferate. melissa: of fundamental problem if you have someone as well known as mount gox which was synonymous with bitcoin and a little teeny guy, flex:getting wiped out by hackers that is a serious problem. how do you solve that? does their need to be some sort of deposit insurance? how do you deal with that? >> if it is a hacker problem is a question of cybersecurity. is a problem not just for bitcoin but all our institutions. we regulate all need to have appropriate safeguards in place to deal with packers. melissa: your deposits are insured so that is why i ask the question do you need some protection? >> insurance may ultimately be a way to go but also just having a regulatory framework, having a regulator on premis
the environment was going to be like in the jail. he was very helpful. he came with me. and just every step i took towards the room. i remembered every thing that happened on february 20th. i was in so much pain. i had memories of my son. we walked in the room and i face the wall because at that moment, i was still thinking whether i really wanted to face this man or not. the minute they told me he entered the room, i turned around and i did not know what was going to happen. the minute i saw him and i looked so close to his eyes, i saw the evil in him. i saw no remorse and i saw that he was not really sorry. i wanted to tell him in person what my son goes through every day. >> what does your son go through every day? you told us every day you watch your son die. every morning you rush to your son's side because why? >> we live moment by moment with my son because he can suddenly just get sick. he doesn't give a sign that he is going to get sick, but he can get sick to the point where his oxygen drops. we have time to rush him to the er. we call the ambulance to take him to the er. every day my so
is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. so when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. i had people who encouraged me and not just my mom and grandparents, but teachers and community leaders. they pushed me to work hard and study hard and make the most of myself. if i didn't listen, they said it again. if i didn't listen, they said it a third time and they would give me second chances and third chances. they never gave up on me. so i didn't give up on myself. i told these young men my story then and i repeat it now because i firmly believe that every child deserves the same chances that i had. that's why we are here today. to do what we can in this year of action to give more young americans the support they need to make good choices. to be resilient and overcome obstacles. achieve their dreams. this is an issue of national importance. this is as important as any issue that i work on. it's an issue that goes to the very heart of why i ran for president. because if america stands for anything, it stands for the idea of opportunity fo
in the locker room. have you noticed anything different? >> no. it's the same environment. everything is the same. just -- like i said before, 12 years in the nba, not a problem, not an issue. year 13, not a problem, not an issue. same old, same old. >> that's it for me. i'm brooke baldwin. "the lead with jake tapper" starts right now. >>> the white house warns russia not to do what russia may have already started doing. i'm jake tapper. this is "the lead." the world lead. it's playing out like a tom changes see thriller. ousted ukrainian president viktor yanukovych breaks his silence and vows to fight for his country's future as russian troops are spotted. the politics lead. flashback friday. withheld pages from the clinton presidency is released and shines new light onla
his opposition to obamacare. >> you know what, in a sane environment do when they have problems with a good objective in they fix the problems. the other choice is to just pout if you're not in the white -- if your party is not in the white house, and make as many problems as you can, stop anything good from happening. and if you can't stop it, at least bad-mouth it, and then when life being what it is and all of us being imperfect as we are, when there's a problem, do everything you can to make sure the problem is never fixed. it may work in an election get people all torn up, everybody mad all the time. but it's a dumb way to run a country. >> let's bring in nbc news political reporter kasie hunt, who spent time in ken last week with all of the top candidates. she did a great piece for us, looking at the senate race. your take on the latest developments, including bill clinton being brought in. >> delivering a stem-winder, as usual. clinton was trying to, in that bite you just played, sort of lay out an argument that alison grimes could use as she tries to defend the policies
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)